Archive

Posts Tagged ‘credibility’

Honoring Your Friends

April 1st, 2009

Orange friends: Be active with them and don’t slow them down. Be spontaneous, fun and not a drag. Stay optimistic and upbeat in conversations. Don’t ask them to do a lot of planning and details, but stay flexible and ready to spring into action. Recognize that they’re constantly busy and will not always stay on track.

Blue friends: Be receptive to longer conversations and share your feelings and thoughts. Praise their imagination and creativity and be aware they wear their heart on their sleeve. Actively listen to them without fixing, as they listen to you, spend quality time one-on-one with them and stay supportive.

Green friends: Be mindful of their need for independence and desire to think things through and consider all options. Be aware of their natural curiosity about life and give them things that challenge their problem-solving abilities. Respect their inventions and ideas and remember that they look for credibility and prefer much of their communication by e-mail.

Gold friends: Remember to stay on time and on track. Be dependable and loyal and make sure to be extra organized and efficient. Do what you say and return things you borrow promptly. Be aware that they have a close and small circle of friends, a definite line between work and personal life, and a strong sense of privacy. Keep conversations with them focused and to the point.

Not Your Typical Job Interview

July 1st, 2008

The Arizona Republic recently had an article on job interview horrors entitled: Putting your worst foot forward. Some of the stories were quite funny, ranging from candidates dozing off, to flagrant lying that didn’t even match the resume, or the candidate who was actually programming his cellphone during the interview and was stunned when he was told that it was distracting. Who’d have thunk…

One of the supposed “horror” stories was a real Color conflict that the candidate probably still hasn’t figured out to this day. A lady relates the story of an interview with the CEO of a rather large firm. Upon entering his office for the interview, the only sentence she got was, “nice to meet you. You have exactly one hour to convince me why I should hire you.” Then, the CEO sat down, his face was expressionless and the candidate started to talk.

About 20 minutes later a woman entered the office and sat down between the candidate and the CEO, without ever saying a word, either. Yet the CEO never took his eyes off the interviewee, hadn’t uttered a word, or changed his expression. Exactly an hour later, still never having said a thing, the CEO got up and thanked the woman.

She later learned that the other woman was the CEOs executive assistant and every interview had gone exactly the same way. She got the job because she was the only one who hadn’t gotten completely flustered by the process. Kind of an extreme high Green example, but it’s likely her new boss didn’t become much more chatty even after she was hired.

Walter’s Advice Column

May 1st, 2008

If you have a sense of humor, is this the reason most Greens (or perhaps men in general) shouldn’t write advice columns?

Dear Walter:

I hope you can help me. The other day I set off for work leaving my husband in the house watching the TV as usual. I hadn’t gone more than a few hundred yards down the road when my engine conked out and the car shuddered to a halt. I walked back home to get my husband’s help. When I got home I couldn’t believe my eyes. He was parading in front of the wardrobe mirror in one of my dresses and high-heel shoes. When I confronted him, he broke down, cried, and admitted that he’d been wearing my clothes for six months and he says he has been feeling increasingly depressed. I love him very much, but he has become increasingly distant. I don’t feel I can get through to him anymore. Can you please help?

Sheila

Dear Sheila:

A car stalling after being driven a short distance can be caused by a variety of faults with the engine. Start by checking that there is no debris in the fuel line. If it is clear, check the jubilee clips holding the vacuum pipes onto the inlet manifold. If none of these approaches solves the problem, it could be that the fuel pump itself is faulty, causing low delivery pressure to the carburetor float chamber.

I hope this helps.

Walter

Some Recent News Stories

February 1st, 2008
  • Americans will spend more than $2 billion this year just on closet organizers.

Is this the Gold group or others that wish they were more organized?

  • Of all the coffee drinkers, only 52% drink their coffee at work.

Doesn’t that drive high Golds crazy wasting time going out for coffee? Or is it their get-away from stress? Is it a high Green way to get some alone-time, or are the other 48% mostly high Blues who would rather get together with someone and will make that quality time with others?

  • Baseball fan sues over tattoo misspelling

One of the most important values for high Greens is credibility. When selling or explaining something, if they catch you in a lie or a bluff, you’re dead and they’re gone, never to return – period. In that same way, they want to be credible, so even when sending e-mails, they’ll run the letter through spell check to make sure it’s correct.

Well, the person creating a tattoo for Jason Harris, a huge St. Louis Cardinal baseball fan, probably should have been high Green – but wasn’t. The tattoo was to read: Cardinals – World Series Champions 2006. But the year was wrong and it was Word – not World. Harris is now suing.

  • Survey reveals our biggest pet peeves in the office!

CareerBuilder.com recently reported on a study of office annoyances conduced by the staffing firm Randstad USA. What was the biggest office pet peeve? Condescending tone of voice at 44%! After that, the next four were public reprimands, micromanagement, loud talkers and cell phones ringing at work.

  • O Magazine reader survey

A spring 2007 survey of O (the Oprah) magazine readers showed some really interesting stats. But do remember that this was an on-line survey so it’s not exactly scientific. Some of these make it clear which Color answered the survey:

  • 34% get all the “me” time they need
  • 60% consider their to-do lists a time-management friend and agree that “you can’t beat the rush from crossing off the last task.”
  • 13% admit they really don’t exaggerate when they claim to schedule every bathroom visit
  • 46% say they shouldn’t be up or working when the sun isn’t up either.

Wikipedia vs. Citizendium

January 1st, 2008

If you’ve done any searches on the web you’ve been to Wikipedia, the huge on-line, free content encyclopedia on the internet, with over seven million entries. The idea was formed in 2001 by two friends, in a Mexican restaurant, as a site where everyone in the world could contribute articles, features and information in an open and unrestricted forum.

One of the founders of Wikipedia was Larry Sanger, and it would take you about thirty seconds to realize that Sanger is a very high Green. That makes sense, from the logic behind Wikipedia, to its early evolution.

But within a year, Sanger left the company because it no longer had credibility in his eyes, when he started to question the accuracy and integrity of many entries and contributions in Wikipedia. Yes, he walked away after disagreements with his partner as to who can contribute to the site, even before it became the giant it is today. It wasn’t, and isn’t, about money, fame or success. It’s always about credibility and doing it right.

Or in the words of Sanger himself: “Wikipedia began as a good-natured anarchy, a sort of Rousseauian state of digital nature. I always took Wikipedia’s anarchy to be provisional and purely for purposes of determining what the best rules and the nature of its authority should be. What I, and other Wikipedians, failed to realize is that our initial anarchy would be taken by the next wave of contributors as the very essence of the project – how Wikipedia was “meant” to be.”

So what does the high Green Sanger do? He thinks of a better and more credible site and has now launched citizendium.org. This one however, has firm editorial rules and mandatory disclosure of the real names of editors, whereas Wikipedia allows anyone with a fictitious user name to contribute untraceable content.

This Month on TV: Restaurant Makeover

October 1st, 2007

If you get a chance, find a show called Restaurant Makeover on the Food Network. The first time I watched it, guest designer Cherie Stinson took on the renovation of The Town Grill restaurant.

The good news was that Stinson is high Orange. The bad news was that both restaurant partners were high Green. The first quarter of the show was Stinson attempting to convince the owners that their place was “dingy, dark, 1990s decorations, crappy clutter and a bar that looked like it was built by a 10-year old.” It became apparent that she wanted to (make that: was going to) gut the place, whereas the owners had been looking for a new paint job, at most.

But when it comes to creativity and visualizing renovation, or decorating changes, always bet on the high Orange and trust them on this! The same holds true for most high Blues, it’s just that designer Sherry Stinson’s high Orange wasn’t going to cave in, settle, compromise or make a deal of any kind. (She was also the reason this episode had a course language warning – not something that would be necessary with a high Blue designer).

Her solution to the impasse? Agree to “minor changes” and just get the owners to leave for the week. But then, the typical Orange mindset tends to be: I’d rather ask for forgiveness than permission or: Yea – whatever – I’m going to do this and you’ll LOVE it when I’m done! (Yes – news flash: they do that in your office, too!)

In any event, within a couple of hours, her crew had gutted the place. But imagine the look of horror on the face of the owners. “Well,” said Stinson, “we might as well keep going now…” which simply had the hyperventilating owners leave again. While she may have had no credibility with the high Green partners, the end result was worth it when the comments started with “nice” and “good”, but quickly escalated to “awesome and amazing.”

Whether it’s your Christmas party, creative ideas for your team, or some renovations at home, make sure you have a high Orange involved. After all, we can’t be specialists at everything – but this is an area where your Orange friends or teammates will shine and really come through! For a high Orange, something like this isn’t work – it’s fun, an awesome challenge and they’ll win – and you’ll love it!

Kind of like the words of a bumper sticker: Sit down, hold on and shut up.